Comic Book Club – DC Comics Bombshells

There’s a fever in the air, a fever that can only be satiated by a gal named Gal, nay, a woman, a wonder woman. The interest in Wonder Woman has skyrocketed since the release of Wonder Woman which, in its three plus weeks, has grossed nearly $318 million, surpassing Logan and Fate of the Furious for 2017 domestic box office gross (from boxofficemojo.com). And if the number of tickets purchase doesn’t have you convinced, just check out how excited Felicia Day was about all this Wonder Woman swag:

While I didn’t want it to be, Wonder Woman was, at its heart, a well-told origin story. We learn about Diana’s spoiled childhood on Themyscira. We see her reactions when she learns that good is not as black and white as she thought. We watch her respond to a world which pushes against her convictions. The blend of the strong female warriors of Themyscira and the pure chaos men have caused in the outside world creating an engaging story even without the gender politics. This is a great film and for people new to these characters, they will be looking for comics featuring them to read.

The DC Comics Bombshells got their start back in 2011 when artist Ant Lucia was commissioned for a series of sketches and figurines of the women of DC Comics as 1940s inspired, plane nose cone, WWII pin-ups, first featuring Wonder Woman, Stargirl, Poison Ivy, and Harley Quinn. People started cosplaying as these characters even though they never had a story written about them. Their popularity soared so much that in 2015, Marguerite Bennett and various artists released the DC Comics Bombshells which we know and love today. In an interview with DC Comics News from SDCC16, Bennett stated how she wanted to give each of these characters their own agency. She also points out that each character’s story arc mimics a specific media genre from the era. Batwoman’s story is an old-time radio drama, Supergirl’s is a propaganda film, Zatanna’s a dark horror film. When you think of the characters and stories in context of genres, it adds another rich layer to the storytelling.

2017.25 Bombshells

I love stories that bend our familiar cast of characters into unfamiliar situations, which is exactly what DC Comics Bombshells does. The base premise is that none of the characters are derivative of their male equivalents; Batwoman saves the Waynes in the alley, therefore there is no Batman. Supergirl is an alien from outer space being raised in the country by Russian peasants. Zatanna, performing in a German cabaret where she unwilling releases a great evil. How will these and other DC Comics superheroines and supervillains come together to defeat the unnatural evils fanning the flames of World War II? You learn about their adventures and the lives of many more Bombshells along the way.

For you book club, here are some questions to get the conversation going:

What is it about the Bombshells lines do you think many female fans gravitated towards?

What do you think of all the Bombshell’s foes? Who do you think the main villain is?

Do the villains and other supplemental characters take the story too far away from the WWII origins?

Were you exposed to any new DC Comics female characters who you weren’t aware of before reading this book? What do you think of their place in the DC Universe?

Who is your favorite character design?

Is there another time you’d like to see the Bombshells explore?

Do you like DC Comics Bombshells? Tell me your favorite part on Twitter @librnwithissues or in the comments below.

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